Multimedia

Author Topic: Lube, Grease, and Whatnot  (Read 25392 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sheepdog

  • Site Admin
  • Administrator
  • O.G. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29622
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #45 on: January 04, 2007, 09:54:03 PM »
Quote from: Van Allen;1592927
i've used Phil Wood Grease, and Sheep, I actually picked it up after you "praised" it in the last thread like this, unfortunately I'm all out. Should I get more or is the Finish Line Grease I have so much of at work suffictient?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.


Finish Line is not as good in my opinion. I did my Profile cassette bearings with it, and was not impressed. Seemed awefully thin and did not last.

I would get more if you can. The stuff lasts a long time if you go easy on it. Most people use way too  much grease.

Offline Van Allen

  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 5374
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2007, 01:05:49 AM »
Quote from: sheepdog;1594574
Finish Line is not as good in my opinion. I did my Profile cassette bearings with it, and was not impressed. Seemed awefully thin and did not last.

I would get more if you can. The stuff lasts a long time if you go easy on it. Most people use way too  much grease.


ok, so i looked into some more Phil Wood Grease. I'll probably use it on bearing applications like the headset and in actual bearings... but as for say, bb assembly and bolts and seat post would you suggest the finishline, which i have more of, or the spray-can of tri-flow?
Perfectly Punctual People Prefer Pedal Power

Offline PaulE

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 538
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #47 on: January 07, 2007, 09:16:42 AM »
I agree that finish line grease is a bit thin - washes out of bearings too easily.

I'm currently using MAKT suspension fork grease in everything.  Used it in a headest when I ran out of other grease and it worked really well (stays in place and doesn't seem to degrade as badly as finish line).  Nice blue colour also, if that matters to you?

Tend to use 3in1 oil in cables, that or finish line XC wet lube, whichever I find first in the cellar.  For my chain I go for wet lube and wipe off the excess after it's had a while to seep in.  On the mountain bike I tend to do the chain and cables with GT85 before and after a ride because its quick, easy and very cheap.
Confucious he say:
Man who walk through airport turnstile sideways going to Bangkok

Offline along

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #48 on: January 12, 2007, 08:47:38 PM »
Quote from: sheepdog;1592866
You guys make it too complicated.

All you really need is:


White Lightening for chain and cables

Quote


Sheep, which White Ligtning is it? Self-Cleaning Wax Lub, or Epic?

and what does ORM-D mean?

thanks.
along life behind bars

Offline Tubes6al4v

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3298
    • View Profile
    • http://bmxtech.blogspot.com/
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #49 on: January 12, 2007, 09:29:13 PM »
Quote from: along;1609845
Quote from: sheepdog;1592866
You guys make it too complicated.

All you really need is:


White Lightening for chain and cables



Sheep, which White Ligtning is it? Self-Cleaning Wax Lub, or Epic?

and what does ORM-D mean?

thanks.


The regular White Lightinging (self cleaning) is what he was refering to. Epic is a nice chain lube, but stay put as well as the regular.

ORM-D is some sort of classification of lube that (according with federal law) cannot be shipped over air.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2007, 09:31:19 PM by Tubes6al4v »

Offline sheepdog

  • Site Admin
  • Administrator
  • O.G. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29622
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #50 on: January 12, 2007, 10:10:03 PM »
Quote from: along;1609845

Quote


Sheep, which White Ligtning is it? Self-Cleaning Wax Lub, or Epic?

thanks.

Self-Cleaning Wax

Epic stays wet (I think).

Offline along

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #51 on: January 12, 2007, 10:38:41 PM »
thanks for the advice .  

the mail-order website ran out of stock phil wood grease. what's the next best waterproof grease option? is tri-flow's synthetic grease with teflon a good substitute? (edit: what about Motorex PrepM?)

unsure if this mentioned in previous threads; what's white grease? what are they meant for? (edit: is it the same as silicone grease? i've tried the wikipedia)
« Last Edit: January 12, 2007, 10:45:29 PM by along »
along life behind bars

Offline sheepdog

  • Site Admin
  • Administrator
  • O.G. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29622
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2007, 11:22:05 PM »
Quote from: along;1610041
thanks for the advice .  

the mail-order website ran out of stock phil wood grease. what's the next best waterproof grease option? is tri-flow's synthetic grease with teflon a good substitute? (edit: what about Motorex PrepM?)

unsure if this mentioned in previous threads; what's white grease? what are they meant for? (edit: is it the same as silicone grease? i've tried the wikipedia)


White grease is a thinner grease based on lithium usually.

Call the local shop about Phil Wood, many carry it.

Offline wheelr

  • Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 8970
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #53 on: January 13, 2007, 02:27:41 AM »
Quote from: dooley;1579119
lolz@this thread




F1 and NASA don't use as many different brand lubricants as some of these kids.:big:

Offline Tubes6al4v

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3298
    • View Profile
    • http://bmxtech.blogspot.com/
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #54 on: January 13, 2007, 01:10:53 PM »
Quote from: wheelr;1610296


F1 and NASA don't use as many different brand lubricants as some of these kids.:big:


Some people don't simply want their bike to "just work". I want mine to feel a specific way. I also enjoy experimenting around with the different types of lubes that are available.

I am sure that NASA and F1 research groups have run through many more lubes than almost all bikers. Boeing could find a lube that was suitable (in all the tests they ran) so they produced their own...

Offline sheepdog

  • Site Admin
  • Administrator
  • O.G. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29622
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #55 on: January 13, 2007, 02:05:57 PM »
Quote from: Tubes6al4v;1610841
Some people don't simply want their bike to "just work". I want mine to feel a specific way. I also enjoy experimenting around with the different types of lubes that are available.

I am sure that NASA and F1 research groups have run through many more lubes than almost all bikers. Boeing could find a lube that was suitable (in all the tests they ran) so they produced their own...


Yes, but you only have a couple different surfaces on a bike and this is not rocket science.  All bearings are roughly the same size and type, most metal to metal contact is one of 2 metals usually.

3 or 4 lubricants should cover everything.

There is no need to do a Nasa style testing of lubes. Most have been tried and tested many times already for our application. It is a bike, not a rocket going into uncharted territory.

Offline sheepdog

  • Site Admin
  • Administrator
  • O.G. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 29622
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #56 on: January 13, 2007, 02:08:20 PM »
A  bit more about chain and cable lubricants.

While many still do it, lubing your chain and cables with a oil based lubricant is archaic. It is messy and just collects dirt, which means you are just wet  sanding your chain, especially when you have guys drowning their chains in oil. You can walk up to my chain, grab it, and not get more than a bit dusty.  Still runs perfectly smooth, and in fact the wax, will absorb the dirt and keep it from grinding away at the metal. Remember, chains have no protection from dirt.

Sram/Sedisport used to make a chain lube that was a block of wax that you melted into a pain, and after a good solvent cleaning, you soaked the chain in the wax, best chain lube ever. Last I saw their chains still came from the factory lubed that way and are known for their smoothness.

Pour the right type of wax onto a chain and you can watch the chain tighten up as it fills in all the gaps, creating smooth bearing surfaces again. Very cool  to see, and even better to feel afterwards.

Offline dead sailor

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2941
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #57 on: January 14, 2007, 12:25:41 AM »
As far as greasing bearings in wheels and whatnot, should I put grease on the axle, or is there anywhere else I should put grease?

EDIOT

  • Guest
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #58 on: March 28, 2007, 08:52:33 PM »
to be honest, if you're not educated about grease too well, you could just follow with these basic guidelines. some might disagree with me, but you have to understand at in different places (different temperature, humidity, etc) can actually affect the type of grease that is ideal for use. what i list here is the generic, basic needs

you'd need only three different products for a reasonably good performance: a grease with teflon, a grease WITHOUT teflon (preferably with less water, things such as copper grease, anti seize, ti prep are all in this category), and lastly, lubricant. also a cameo appearance for any citric based cleaner/WD-40

for all the THREADS AND BOLTS, on the seatpost, on crankarms/pedal bosses, use the GREASE WITHOUT TEFLON. The purpose of the grease is only to mainly create a layer between the two metals so that they do not come into direct contact and seize up, and also to smoothen the tightening. Teflon grease is not neccesary and could be bad for older parts as it encourages slipping.

for bearings, you could use the GREASE WITH TEFLON. The thickness of the grease would partially determine your rolling resistance, the thicker, the 'slower' you'd feel rolling. (but honestly, unless you're really, really anal about the rolling and already run super high tire pressure, it doesn't make a difference in riding). Thicker grease is usually better at preventing water sipping into the bearings hence less maintainence, it would be more ideal for hotter climates as the temperature makes it more 'runny' and there's a bit less rolling resistance. Thinner grease is more 'runny' than thick ones in cold weather, but water sips in a bit quicker. Remember that all bearings warm up a little after you ride for a few minutes and the rolling resistance is brought down to a minimal, so i always recommend getting a thick teflon grease for bearings.

as for LUBRICANTS, i'm talking about the dripping wet type stuff. you should go for the thinner stuff for better performance, those 'winter wax' style lubricants are good if you always keep an eye on stuff but when it dries a little, they gunk up and get a bit messy. with the thin, dripping wet lube, you can use it to soak the shit out of your cable inner, and the inside of the cable house. trust me, it makes a world of difference. as for the cable nipple and the area on the brake lever that houses it, use either grease there.

for the chain, i don't recommend wax due to it gunking up over time, what you should do is spray the fuck out of it with citric cleaner or WD-40, to the point that it only drips out the solution as clean as you spray into it (make sure not to spary onto bearings!! best would be to take the chain OFF the bike to do it). after you sprayed it clean, LET IT DRY for about 30 minutes before you put it back on, and put lube on it. wet up the whole chain and work it into the rollers, then use an old cloth to wipe the outside off of excess. the chain is the one area that you should add lube on a weekly basis. when you add lube, all you need is to drip lube onto the chain while backpedalling.

if you're not able to buy the two types of different grease, it's safer to just buy one big tub of copper grease/lithium grease, and use it for all applications (including bearings). remember that the thicker the grease, the less chance of water seeping in. also, copper grease is known as anti-seize as well, and make sure you're extra generous when it comes to titanium contact points

Offline Flybiker

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3345
    • View Profile
Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #59 on: July 27, 2007, 08:25:08 PM »
This may sound retarded but how do you put grease into your  Bearings? just get a small blob then work it in around the sealed area or what?
This area

Just checking to make sure ive been doing it right for the last few years :X

Bikeguide.org - Bike maintenance for BMX'ers

Lube, Grease, and Whatnot
« Reply #59 on: July 27, 2007, 08:25:08 PM »

 

-->

Tell them " Sheepdog sent you", for a little something special

Click this image for a little something special