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Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #75 on: March 20, 2015, 05:15:20 AM »
Quote
http://weightweenies.starbike.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=125323&start=15#p1110807

3d printed cassette section for testing I've just made, material is Stainless steel.

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #76 on: March 20, 2015, 05:18:08 AM »
can't see the m without thinking MOSH







http://www.mehmi-bikes.com/en/projects.htm

Offline alaskun

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Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #78 on: April 16, 2015, 08:34:08 AM »










http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150416-japanese-design-studio-dmm-akiba-viable-3d-printed-titanium-road-bike-milan-salone.html

http://3dprint.com/58679/3d-printed-bicycle-2/

http://www.triplebottomline.cc/dc2015/dfm.html

Quote
April 16, 2015

...weights approximately 15 pounds...

The price for the final product has not yet been set, but is expected to cost a hefty 500,000 to 700,000 Japanese Yen ($4200 – $5900) for the frame alone...
« Last Edit: April 16, 2015, 08:35:48 AM by alaskun »

Offline MilkyWilky

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #79 on: April 21, 2015, 03:53:01 PM »
Bruce Wayne Frame

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #80 on: April 22, 2015, 04:13:27 AM »
before I edited that post I'd written something about a batmobile/gt show...

http://bmxmuseum.com/bikes/gt_bicycles/?model=752



the places that always cracked could all be done triangle-monocoque like that with reinforcements on the inside, and the pacman dropouts-to-bottom bracket junction/knurling could be awesome...


Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #81 on: June 07, 2015, 07:36:30 AM »
http://www.pinarello.com/en/resources/files/WHITEPAPER_BOLIDE_ENG4.pdf

http://mercurycentre.org/latest/2015/3d-printed-handlebars-for-bradley-wiggins%E2%80%99-world-hour-record-attempt











Quote
June 5, 2015

...The designers paid particular attention to the design of the handlebar because it has a major influence on the aero performance of the whole bike thanks to its position at the front.

“Behind the spacers for the arm rests, a low pressure zone is generated, because of the transition between the parts,” says Pinarello. “A proper design of this zone helps to reduce this, and consequently the drag.

“Standard technologies, such as CNC or carbon molding, would be excessively long and expensive to produce this particular shape, so we used an Additive Manufacturing method (also known as 3D Prining) to manufacture a titanium handlebar.

"In the additive manufacturing technique a high energy source locally melts the powdered material (typically metal), as defined by a 3D model, binding the material together to create a solid structure.

“The capabilities of this technology allowed [us] to produce a small batch of handlebars, everyone different from the other… This method will now be used to provide a similar service to Pinarello customers via the MOST parts brand.”








^the crown bit was printed in wax then cast in 4130, the bar clamps are printed stainless.  album - http://imgur.com/a/yYCDU#0




“The bike features a number of 3D-printed parts including: stainless steel stem cap, high-detail stainless steel head badge and BB serial badge, headset/steerer cap, and handle bar end plugs. http://www.cycleexif.com/marshall-loose-goose http://bradmarshall.com.au/ "




Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #82 on: July 09, 2015, 06:54:54 AM »
"Titanium bicycle frame lug, showing breakable support fins that help to dissipate heat during printing"


"One of Bastion Cycles' titanium bicycle frame lug designs"

 http://www.gizmag.com/csiro-lab-22-additive-manufacture-3d-printing-australia-titanium/37955/pictures#23


http://www.bastion-cycles.com/gallery.html

Bastion Cycles combine customized 3D printed titanium and carbon -Fully custom disc road bike coming soon
Quote
July 09, 2015

...Bastion is a new start-up consisting of three R&D engineers from Toyota Australia. The company will soon start to produce custom, lightweight and performance-orientated road frames that feature titanium 3D printed lugs and spun carbon tubes.

Bastion is not the first to create bikes with 3D printed titanium technology, with the likes of Empire and Flying Machine having done so for over a year now, but Bastion’s intended streamlining of the customization process is a first.

Speaking with Dean McGeary, Bastion’s technical director, we were told of an agreement they have with the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) for 3D printing.

“They’ve set up a center of excellence in 3D printing called Lab 22. They’ve just gone live as of July 1st and we’ll have full access to the lab that’s really close to us,” said McGeary...


Quote
early prototype

















« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 06:58:32 AM by alaskun »

Offline BilboBaggins

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #83 on: July 09, 2015, 07:12:10 AM »
I would fall right off that bike in post 81. Wtf aero

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #84 on: July 12, 2015, 03:55:36 AM »
I would fall right off that bike in post 81. Wtf aero
just think of the high-speed nosewheelies...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=si-bI84SZKA




^^    Bastion Cycles gears up to launch custom 3D printed road bikes later this year
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150710-bastion-cycles-gears-up-to-launch-custom-3d-printed-road-bikes-later-this-year.html
Quote
July 12, 2015

...Among others who have been exploring the applications of additive manufacturing with metals in their craft include Australia’s Bastion Bicycles, a new start-up consisting of three R&D engineers from Toyota Australia.  Currently, the engineers are developing a system for producing custom, lightweight and performance-orientated road bicycle frames that use additive manufacturing to produce titanium lugs and spun carbon tubes. 

While they aren’t the first bicycle maker to explore the possibilities of additive manufacturing in bicycle frame production, a recent agreement that they have with the nearby CSIRO Lab 22 (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization) for using their state-of-the-art 3D printing facility is intended to help them streamline the process of bicycle customization. 

“3D printing is really exciting. It allows complete customization by the user; the frame geometry and ride is fully customizable” says Dean McGeary, Bastion’s technical director. 

“We’re putting ribs in the titanium (lugs); with this we can tune the compliance and stiffness of the bike. If you want a really compliant ride, we can take ribs out, if you want a stiff and aggressive bike, we add in ribs.”

Bastion’s first 3D printed bicycle model will be a disc brake-equipped road bike that will weigh approximately 850g and feature modern accessories including flat mount disc brakes and thru-axles.  According to McGeary, the company will offer customers the ability to choose their bicycle frame’s stiffness and compare it to similar bicycles on the market - such as the Specialized Venge - through the use of an online tool.     

Perhaps most importantly however, are the frame’s safety standards.  According to McGeary, all of the frames that the company produces will be tested using the international standards of EN 14781 and ASTM F2711–08(2012).  Additionally each frame will go through the company’s own rigorous testing process which includes an FEA (finite element analysis) analysis to ensure dependability before final approval from the customer.

“We’re hoping to go live toward the end of this year. We’ll be producing a wide range of bikes to do detailed testing on and once we’ve validated the design – we’ll go live with sales,” added McGeary.

After launch, the company is planning to deliver fully-assembled custom bicycles within four weeks of a customer’s order based on their specified measurements.  Of course, the added customization doesn’t come cheap - the custom 3D printed bicycle frames will start at AU$7,000 - however the price does include a lifetime warranty and a crash replacement policy for individual parts.

http://www.bastion-cycles.com/index.html





this guy (seat post topper thing) has good in-depth updates, and good pictures... lots of detail/insight/trials/tribulation, plus it's bike-related...

http://pencerw.com/feed
Quote
First EBM prints
http://pencerw.com/feed/2015/7/4/first-ebm-prints
2015.7.4

A few weeks ago I visited Addaero Manufacturing, one of the very few EBM (electron beam melting) service providers in the US. After my recent trials (and successes) with laser powder bed fusion, I wanted to try building parts with EBM. EBM is used extensively by aerospace and medical OEMs, but its penetration into the job shop world is way behind laser. Addaero, whose founders (Rich Merlino and Dave Hill) both worked at Pratt & Whitney before striking out on their own, is located just a few hours from New York City, and they were gracious enough to build two parts for me to evaluate the process.

I'll be writing up a longer post on the unique design considerations that EBM poses, but for now I wanted to share the pictures I took while there: ...

this one touches on quality control/porosity issues...
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CT Scanning of 3D printed parts
http://pencerw.com/feed/2015/6/10/ct-scanning-of-3d-printed-parts
June 22, 2015

A few weeks ago I visited CIMP-3D by invitation of its co-director, Dr. Tim Simpson. I was there partly just to visit (I love these kinds of places), but also to see first-hand the role that CT scanning can play in non destructive testing of additively manufactured parts.

CIMP-3D is located at and operated by Penn State University, and serves as part of Penn State's Applied Research Lab - and as an Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Facility for DARPA. In aggregate, they help both government agencies and commercial partners qualify and improve parts made by powder bed fusion and directed energy deposition. In their well-equipped shop, they have two powder bed fusion machines: an EOS M280 (EOS calls their process "DMLS", a term that I continue to get flack for using generically :) and a 3DSystems ProX 200 (3DSystems calls their process, which was developed out of their 2013 acquisition of Phenix Systems, "DMP" - for "direct metal printing). For their work on directed energy deposition, they also have an Optomec LENS MR-7 (a laser based powder deposition machine), and until recently had a Sciaky EBAM (a large scale wire fed electron beam welding machine, which had been sold just prior to my visit).

While I was excited in see their directed energy deposition machines, the real attraction was their GE phoenix v|tome|x m300 CT scanner. This machine is made by GE Measurement & Control division, which is part of GE's Oil & Gas business unit (it should be noted that I've done consulting for both M&C and O&G, though not for the people who make CT scanning equipment). CT scanners are *expensive* (close to $1M, depending on options), and are basically unheard of in private service providers. They can be used to analyze both the as-built form of a part (which will often deviate from the as-designed form significantly), and also any flaws (cracks and voids) which would make it unusable.

Before I visited CIMP-3D, Corey Dickman (an R&D Engineer there) was kind enough to print one of my seatmast toppers, in aluminum, on their EOS M280. It came out well, with only a small defect in the seatmast clamp area. Corey used some pretty clever support structures, tapering them in order to provide a balance between a solid grip on the plate on the one hand, and relatively low material usage on the other: ...
...



...



marvins guts, purple ano...
« Last Edit: July 12, 2015, 06:20:35 AM by alaskun »

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #85 on: July 12, 2015, 06:22:49 AM »



Quote
Neodymium pawls are 3D printed. Note the embedded circular magnets that acts as springs

 http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/inside-the-workshop-of-kappius-components-36402/



« Last Edit: October 03, 2015, 04:14:25 AM by alaskun »

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #86 on: August 11, 2015, 12:53:55 PM »
aluminum...

Quote
This framework model was 3D printed without outer layer, thus bionic details are visible: such as the lattice structure at the bottom bracket, the connection concept of the middle strut and the edge reinforcement on the seat tube. http://elise.de/documents/ELiSE_AM_web_DE.pdf http://www.industrieanzeiger.de/singapore/-/article/32571342/40865255/Leichtbau-bionisch-%E2%80%93-aber-mit-System/art_co_INSTANCE_0000/maximized/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/citim-gmbh











« Last Edit: October 03, 2015, 04:16:40 AM by alaskun »

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #87 on: August 11, 2015, 12:56:36 PM »

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2010 ... the University of Warwick is partnering with the University of Wolverhampton on the assessment of laser sintered titanium for hydraulic components such as manifolds, many of which contain complex fluid flow channels... http://dumpt.com/img/files/vdl7l472korohz6ceftq.png http://www.machinery.co.uk/machinery-features/additive-manufacturing/26036/



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http://startline.org.uk/slol87/wlv/wlv.htm "A thin skinned hollow bike brake handle in aluminium - staggeringly light."

Offline alaskun

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #88 on: August 18, 2015, 06:57:49 AM »
^
and I wonder if anyone will try integrated fluid lines...
looks pretty similar to those chainstays, too...
Quote

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20150818-google-partially-3d-printed-humanoid-atlas-robot-goes-on-successful-walk-in-the-woods.html

In part, the successes have been realized through extensive experimentation with lightweight 3D printed parts. Raibert revealed that in the current state of the robot, the valves for the hydraulic fluids, as well as the shells and lattice structures on the Atlas’s legs have been improved by 3D printing them. While it isn’t known if the final edition will feature 3D printed parts, the technology is thus obviously playing a major role in development.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwrjAa1SgjQ
« Last Edit: August 18, 2015, 07:05:42 AM by alaskun »

Offline blueee

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #89 on: August 25, 2015, 01:05:14 AM »
How much do you think a ti 10t antigram driver would cost? How much do you think it would cost 18mo fr now

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Re: 3D printed titanium parts
« Reply #89 on: August 25, 2015, 01:05:14 AM »

 


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